PhD Candidate

Non-Newtonian Fluids Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, MIT


The Romanesco broccoli pictured here is just one example of the presence of fractal geometries in nature. The microstructures of soft matter and complex fluids abound in them. Image from http://www.flickr.com/photos/tin-g/55563889/sizes/o/

The Romanesco broccoli pictured here is just one example of the presence of fractal geometries in nature. The microstructures of soft matter and complex fluids abound in them. Image from http://www.flickr.com/photos/tin-g/55563889/sizes/o/

I am a graduate student in Gareth McKinley's non-Newtonian Fluids group in the Department on Mechanical Engineering at MIT. My research focuses on the extensional rheology and mathematical modeling of power-law complex fluids and multiscale networks with fractal microstructures. Examples of multiscale networks in rheology include physical and chemical gels, emulsions, soft glasses, and colloidal suspensions. Such materials are termed 'multiscale' because there does not exist any distinctly identifiable length scale in their microstructure, and consequently, no single relaxation time.

Nature provides us with numerous examples of fractals, of which the romanesco broccoli pictured above is just one example. Microstructures of complex fluids frequently contain fractal or pseduo-fractal elements; other examples include cracks and crevasses in mountains, branching in trees and ferns, breaking of ocean waves, patterns formed by clouds and the growth of crystal dendrites. 

Please follow the links above to learn more about my research and my publications.